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Mar 8, 2018

Pulpit To Pew | Ep66 | Don't Go Back To Egypt | Podcast | Reverend Beverly Gibson | Johnny Gwin | Sabbadoodle

In this week's Pulpit To Pew, we discuss radical kinship, understanding through bewilderment, second chances, unconditional love, abiding in faith and the foolishness of following God's wisdom and The Cross.

Jesus frequently used confusion and bewilderment as a means of teaching and leading his disciples to repentance and to metanoia. Metanoia is redemption by going beyond the present mind, to get past our fear and disorientation of the "choir" (hint: the choir is us), turning the corner and running into something new. This inner journey of metanoia pushes us to reach a new and extreme kinship with God and those around us. God gave the "whining" and unfaithful Israelites a second chance with a new covenant and 10 words of "Holy" clarity with the 10 Commandments. Jesus's disruptive action of cleansing the temple was a profound reorientation to seeing the nature of God and a new way to worship. Present day Jesuit priest and author of Barking At The Choir - The Power of Radical Kinship, Father Gregory Boyle lives and gives rise to redemptive second chances with his LA Gang Outreach Mission, Homeboy Industries. His community's stories and found connections demonstrate a new model of Church as a community of inclusive kinship, tenderness, and redemption. In a broken and chaotic world, Father Boyle advises for us to focus on the awe of the incredible gifts God has given us and instead of the judgment of others and our existing situations. We should look for the surprising beauty of receiving and giving second chances. By being open to rethinking our status quo and being on the lookout for ways to confound and deconstruct our reality we can be the foolishness of God's wisdom and the weakness of God's power. Confused? It's OK, this is a good thing.

 

Lectionary:

 

Resources:

Homeboy Industries

Barking To The Choir

Father Gregory Boyle 

Dr. Brenee Brown Sermon